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Yummy Reads and Recipes for National Doughnut Day

Posted on June 3, 2021 at 6:00 am

BY ALISON JOHNSON

From black licorice doughnuts to the Cronut (doughnut made from croissant batter), everyone can find a favorite. Even savory doughnuts exist for those who don’t have a sweet tooth.

Tomorrow is National Doughnut Day, the first Friday in June! You could celebrate by eating a doughnut, reading about doughnuts, and by doing something more.

Do you know how many good books there are with doughnuts as the co-star of the story? Too many probably, but there are a few good ones.

If kids are part of your life, I recommend sitting down with doughnuts and milk to read a good doughnut book. If you don’t have doughnuts, you’ll be craving them by the time you are done reading these.

FOR KIDS

The Hole Story of the Doughnut, by Pat Miller and illustrated by Vincent X. Kirsch

Do you wonder how the doughnut came to be? Who was the person who created this scrumptious pastry? The Hole Story of the Doughnut is a historical fiction children’s book that shares the tale about the person who came up with this nutty pastry idea while adventuring on the high seas. For ages 6–9

The Doughnut Fix, by Jessie Janowitz

The Doughnut Fix is another great story which celebrates the doughnut. In this chapter book, a boy in a new town is on a doughnut endeavor! There is a tale of a legendary chocolate cream doughnut, and he is on a mission to revive the recipe to bring the doughnut back to the people! For ages 9–12

FOR ADULTS

The kids don’t get to have all the doughnut fun. Here are two reads for grownups who like a little bittersweet reading. Both stories have heroines who run doughnut shops and encounter deadly circumstances. One story even has a cat named Deputy Doughnut! Now, how can you resist that!?

COOKBOOKS

You could also celebrate by trying your hand at making doughnuts at home. I have never made doughnuts before, but I am tempted to try.

While making doughnuts seems a little intimidating, the thought of fresh doughnuts is very enticing. I could eat as many as I wanted—a tantalizing and dangerous idea!

If you are interested in this dangerously delectable idea, here are some cookbooks to help. There is even a cookbook for baked doughnuts! Those should be healthier right?

MORE THAN SWEET

National Doughnut Day has a great history. It was created by The Salvation Army in 1938 to honor the volunteers who served doughnuts to soldiers during World War I. The volunteer “Doughnut Lassies” helped keep the morale of the soldiers up with this sweet treat.

You can get into the spirit of the holiday by taking some doughnuts out to our local heroes at your local police station, hospital, fire station, or local veteran’s affairs office. Many will appreciate some doughy goodness.

Don’t forget to save a doughnut for yourself. Whether you read, bake, or give back, there is no wrong way to celebrate National Doughnut Day!

Librarian Alison Johnson

Alison Johnson is an Education and Enrichment Librarian who creates programming and events for ages 8–18. This means she gets to play with everything, including paint messes and mini robots. When she has free time she enjoys watching anything science fiction, hiking trails, and reading with a cup of tea.

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